Ken H. Cadwell

Associate Professor; Skirball Institute of Biomolecular Medicine, Molecular Pathogenesis. Department of Microbiology

Ph.D., 2006 University of California, Berkeley

LAB WEBSITE:
Cadwell Lab
KEYWORDS:
Autophagy, Norovirus, Inflammatory Bowel Disease

Contact Information

Skirball Institute of Biomolecular Medicine
540 First Avenue 2nd floor, Lab 10
New York, N.Y. 10016
Office Tel: (212) 263-8891
Lab Tel: (212) 263-7491
Fax: (212) 263-5711
E-mail: ken.cadwell@med.nyu.edu

Admin Contact

Damien McDonald
Tel: (212) 263-6281
Email: Damien.Mcdonald@med.nyu.edu


Host-Pathogen and Microbiome Interactions in Inflammatory Disease

Our laboratory investigates how host-pathogen and host-microbiome interactions determine the course of inflammation.The immune system provides protection against diverse infectious agents such as viruses, bacteria, fungi, and parasites. However, an excessive immune reaction towards these foreign invaders can cause collateral damage to the surrounding tissue and organs in the form of inflammation. We strive to understand how a balanced immune response is generated, and what happens when this balance is disrupted. We are particularly interested in understanding why some infectious agents cause disease while others are harmless or beneficial, such as the trillions of symbiotic bacteria that colonize our intestine, also referred to as the 'microbiome'. Specific projects in our laboratory examine viruses that are part of the gut microbiome, the role of the cell biological process of autophagy in inflammation, and the relationship between the bacterial sensor NOD2 and intestinal disease. By learning the difference between helpful immune responses versus those that cause inflammatory damage, we will be able to design better treatments for inflammatory bowel disease, cancer, and other chronic inflammatory conditions.

Selected Publications: 
  • Marchiando AM, Ramanan D, Ding Y, Gomez LE, Hubbard-Lucey VM, Maurer K, Wang C, Ziel JW, van Rooijen N, Nuñez G, Finlay BB, Mysorekar IU, Cadwell K.  A Deficiency in the Autophagy Gene Atg16L1 Enhances Resistance to Enteric Bacterial Infection.  Cell Host Microbe. 2013 Aug 14; 14(2):216-24. PMID: 23954160
  • Ramanan D, Bowcutt R, Tang MS, Loke P, Cadwell K. Nod2 prevents small intestinal inflammation by restricting the expansion of a common member of the microbiota. Immunity. 2014 Aug 21;41(2):311-24. PMID: 25088769
  • Hubbard-Lucey VM, Shono Y, Maurer K, West ML, Singer NV, Ziegler CGK, Lezcano C, Motta ACF, Schmid K, Levi SM, Murphy GF, Liu C, Winkler JD, Amaravadi RK, Rogler G, Dickinson AM, Holler E, van den Brink MRM, Cadwell K. Autophagy gene Atg16L1 prevents lethal T cell alloreactivity mediated by dendritic cells. Immunity. 2014 Oct 16;41(4):579-91. PMID: 25308334
  • Kernbauer E, Ding Y, Cadwell K. An enteric virus can replace the beneficial function of commensal bacteria. Nature. 2014 Dec 4;516(7529):94-8. PMID: 25409145
  • Maurer K, Reyes-Robles T, Alonzo F, Durbin J, Torres VJ, Cadwell K. Autophagy Mediates Tolerance to Staphylococcus aureus Alpha-Toxin. Cell Host & Microbe. 2015 Apr 8;17(4):429-40. PMID: 25816775

Click here to see all publications for Dr. Cadwell